Cranberry Sauce-Filled Sufganiyot Recipe

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By Mari Levine

Cranberry Sauce-Filled Sufganiyot
The idea of making doughnuts at home might seem intimidating. Hot oil can be dangerous, and it only takes a couple missteps to turn your doughnuts from light to leaden. But follow this recipe and you’ll have impressive and tasty sufganiyot this year.

This cranberry sauce recipe will make about 1 cup of sauce, which should be enough to fill the doughnuts. But feel free to use leftover cranberry sauce if you’re making this within a few days of Thanksgiving. Whatever cranberry sauce you use, just make sure it’s smooth or else you won’t be able to pipe it. If you don’t have the tools to pipe the sauce (you can also use a zipper-lock bag with the corner snipped off), serve the sauce on the side or drizzle it over the finished doughnuts.

Cranberry Sauce-Filled Sufganiyot

Makes about 20 doughnuts

Cranberry Sauce

1/3 cup water
½ cup granulated sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt
6 ounces frozen cranberries, washed and picked over
1/8 teaspoon orange zest, minced
Pinch cinnamon

Sufganiyot

3 cups (15 ounces) unbleached all-purpose flour, plus extra if needed
1 envelope (about 2¼ teaspoons) instant yeast
6 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon sugar (about 2½ ounces)
¾ teaspoon salt
2/3 cup whole milk, at room temperature
2 large eggs, beaten lightly
6 tablespoons (¾ stick) unsalted butter, cut into 6 pieces, room temperature
4 cups frying oil
Confectioners’ sugar

1. FOR CRANBERRY SAUCE: In medium saucepan, bring water, sugar and salt to boil over medium heat. Add zest and cinnamon, and bring back to boil. Cook until most berries pop, 5 to 10 minutes. Remove from heat, puree until smooth, and set aside.

2. FOR SUFGANIYOT: In a medium bowl, whisk together 3 cups of the flour, the yeast, 6 tablespoons sugar and the salt. Set aside.

3. Place the milk and eggs in the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with a dough hook. Add the flour mixture and mix on low speed for 3 to 4 minutes, or until a ball of dough forms.

4. Add the softened butter one piece at a time, waiting about 15 seconds after each addition. Continue mixing for about 3 minutes longer, adding the remaining flour 1 tablespoon at a time, if necessary, until the dough forms a soft ball.

5. Place the dough in a lightly oiled medium bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let the dough rise at room temperature until nearly doubled in size, 2 to 2½ hours. Place the dough onto a floured surface and, using a rolling pin, roll it out to a ½-inch thickness. Using a 2-inch round cutter, stamp out as many dough rounds as possible and place on a baking sheet about ½ inch apart. Gather the dough scraps into a ball and roll and stamp out again. Cover loosely with plastic wrap or a damp towel. Let rise in a warm place until puffy, about 30 minutes.

6. Meanwhile, line sheet pan with paper towels and heat oil over medium-high heat to 350 degrees. As oil heats, place cranberry sauce in piping bag fitted with round tip.

Chosen Eats7. Place the holes carefully into the hot fat four or five at a time. Fry until golden brown, about 30 seconds per side. Using slotted spoon, remove doughnuts from hot oil and drain on paper towel–lined rimmed baking sheet. Repeat with remaining doughnuts, adjusting temperature so it stays at 350 degrees. When doughnuts are cool enough to handle, use paring knife or chopstick to pierce pocket in side of each doughnut. Place tip of piping bag into pocket and pipe cranberry sauce inside. Dust with confectioners’ sugar and serve.

Chosen Eats appears every Thursday on JewishBoston.com. Read past columns, or contact Mari at maril@JewishBoston.com.

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10 Comments

  1. The Table | On Our Plates: Thanksgivukkah - November 16, 2013

    […] Cranberry Sauce filled Sufganiyot: This link is actually to a site that celebrates all of Thanksgivukkah. They have a countdown and everything, but this recipe looks especially good. Traditional sufganiyots are jelly filled donuts, these add a tart cranberry filling instead. Yum! […]

  2. Things I am currently excited about | Runners Chai - November 21, 2013

    […] family and as the only person who celebrate Hanukkah, I plan on contributing some latkes and cranberry-stuffed sufganiyot. (Note: sufganiyot = jelly donuts. Jelly-filled donuts are a traditional Hanukkah food. Jews […]

  3. botanyflora - November 21, 2013

    how can you roll out to 1/2″ thickness an let it rise to 1/2″? Also what about rings and holes being placed into the hot oil? Nothing was said to cut them out like doughnuts?

  4. JLeNoir - November 22, 2013

    “7. Place the rings and holes” – there are no “holes” according to the directions abouve.

  5. Mari - November 22, 2013

    Hi BOTANYFLORA and JLeNoir– We’ve removed the mention of 1/2″ thickness and the references to rings. (I had considered making this recipe for rings in addition to doughnut holes, but I decided doughnut holes are more traditional. But by all means, make whichever shape you prefer! You may just have to slightly adjust the frying time if the rings are bigger.) Happy Thanksgivukkah. –Mari

  6. Thanksgivukkuh: A Once-in-a-Lifetime Holiday - Slow Family - November 24, 2013

    […] More Cranberry Filled Sufganivots (Doughnuts) from Thanksgivukkah Boston […]

  7. Week 10: A Thanksgivukkah Meal | 52 Weeks of Something Different - November 24, 2013

    […] Apple Stuffing Sweet Potato Latkes Pumpkin Challah Cranberry Sauce-Filled Sufganiyot […]

  8. THANKSGIVUKKAH | THE BUZZ - November 27, 2013

    […] A sufganiyah is a round jelly doughnut that is deep-fried, filled with jelly or custard, and then topped with powdered sugar and traditionally eaten in Israel during Hanukkah. Swap strawberry jelly for cranberry sauce to transform this typical donut into its Thanksgiving-friendly edition. Try this recipe. […]

  9. A sweet treat each night for Hanukkah | Alabama - November 30, 2013

    […] Sufganiyot. Traditional Jewish doughnuts are filled with sweet cranberry sauce for the perfect combination of […]

  10. Thanksgivukkah: The Challahday of a Lifetime | Interpreting Religion: Methods and Theories - December 9, 2013

    […] gelt. Other items potentially gracing Thanksgivukkah tables this year were sweet potato Latkes, cranberry sauce filled sufganiyot, challah stuffing, and deep fried turkey all of which exemplify Gill’s notion that play […]

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